Americans are more likely to say the COVID-19 pandemic strengthened their religious faith

According to the Pew Research Center, about three in ten American adults reported a stronger religious faith as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

As detailed in the Pew data, Americans are more likely to describe a stronger religious faith as a result of the pandemic, more so than any other highly-developed nation in the world.

The survey was conducted in the Summer of 2020.

Americans most likely to say pandemic has made their religious faith stronger

“A Pew Research Center survey conducted in the summer of 2020 reveals that more Americans than people in other economically developed countries say the outbreak has bolstered their religious faith and the faith of their compatriots,” the report states.

“Nearly three-in-ten Americans (28%) report stronger personal faith because of the pandemic, and the same share think the religious faith of Americans overall has strengthened, according to the survey of 14 economically developed countries,” it continued.

Although the respondents with a higher income reported an increase in religious faith since the start of the pandemic, there was a slightly large prevalence among the respondents with a lower income.

People with lower incomes more likely to say coronavirus boosted their faith

Moreover, the COVID-19 pandemic also led to a tightening of family bonds.

From the Pew report: “Many in countries that were hit hard by initial waves of infections and deaths in the spring say their family relationships have strengthened. That is the case in Spain (42%), Italy, the UK and the U.S. (41% each). In the U.S. and in several other countries, younger adults are especially likely to say they feel a stronger bond with immediate family members since the start of the pandemic.”

The Pew Research Center is a US-based nonpartisan think tank devoted to public opinion polling, demographic analysis, and social science research.

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