Most Americans say news sources are unethically publishing partisan rhetoric, survey claims

The survey involved more than 10,000 American participants, including close to 9,000 registered voters.

2 min read

Many Americans say news sources are not publishing accurate or complete information in their reporting of government or politics, a new survey claims.

Published by the Pew Research Center, an American-based think tank chaired by Michael X. Delli Carpini, their survey conducted weeks before the 2020 general election suggests that two-thirds of U.S. adults witnessed news sources report stories rooted in partisan rhetoric.

The survey involved more than 10,000 American respondents, including close to 9,000 registered voters. A substantial number of those respondents, or 37 percent, stated they came across misinformation or news by established sources aimed at misleading their audiences.

Overall, the findings allege a concern for the use of misinformation among American journalists.

“The findings come against a backdrop of broader concern about misinformation in the United States,” the Pew Research findings claim.

“In the same survey, 59% of Americans say made-up information that is intended to mislead causes a “great deal” of confusion about the 2020 presidential election. Many say the same about breaking news that is not fully verified (47%) or factual information presented to favor one side of an issue (42%).”

The survey also touched bases on the registered voters’ preference when it comes to the Democratic and Republican presidential candidates. The presidential nominees from both parties yielded similar results in the survey, although supporters from the Republican presidential nominee experienced slightly more partisan rhetoric from their news sources.

Trump voters about twice as likely as Biden voters to say their own news sources have published made-up info

The Pew Research Center models itself as a nonpartisan think tank devoted to public opinion polling, demographic analysis, and social science research. It is based in the nation’s capital.

Image courtesy of Shutterstock