How tau buildup could predict future cognitive decline in primary progressive aphasia caused by Alzheimer’s

New findings in Alzheimer’s and Dementia show a biomarker in the brain may predict future cognitive decline in primary progressive aphasia caused by Alzheimer’s.

The study was conducted at Northwestern University.

Researchers centered on tau pathology as biomarkers for predicting future cognitive decline and the progression of a disease like Alzheimer’s. Increased levels of specific tau in the brain were linked to worsening cognitive function.

Positron emission tomography was used to assess certain areas of the brain of interest.

“Higher tau PET burden was associated with atrophy and younger age. There was a significant left-lateralized relationship between lower BNT and more atrophy, and between lower BNT and increased tau burden,” the authors indicated in their findings.

“Variance in naming was primarily shared between tau and atrophy (51%), but naming was uniquely explained more by atrophy (32%) than tau (16%). Higher left anterior temporal tau burden was associated with greater 1-year rate of decline in naming.”

Image courtesy of Getty Images/Science Photo Libra
More Stories
Study unveils distinct set of cognitive and personality attributes associated with extremist views