Pfizer and BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is very effective for preventing contagion

The study reported no serious safety concerns.

2 min read

As cases of COVID-19 continue to fluctuate across various regions of the world, vaccines have been administered at near-record paces. One of the most prominent vaccines for SARS-CoV-2 is the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine.

According to a new report, the Pfizer/BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine is over 91 percent effective six months after people get the second dose.

The efficacy rate was established following a clinical trial involving about 46,000 participants.

The study reported no serious safety concerns.

“Analysis of 927 confirmed symptomatic cases of COVID-19 demonstrates BNT162b2 is highly effective with 91.3% vaccine efficacy observed against COVID-19, measured seven days through up to six months after the second dose,” a Pfizer news release reads.

“Vaccine was 100% effective in preventing severe disease as defined by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and 95.3% effective in preventing severe disease as defined by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration,” it also states.

“Vaccine was 100% effective in preventing COVID-19 cases in South Africa, where the B.1.351 lineage is prevalent Vaccine safety now evaluated in more than 44,000 participants 16 years of age and older, with more than 12,000 vaccinated participants having at least six months follow-up after their second dose.”

The findings were released to the public amid safety concerns of other vaccines in the Western world, including one developed by Oxford University. Oxford’s COVID-19 vaccine AZD1222, or Vaxzevria, reported an efficacy rate near 60 percent, with a potential increased risk of severe health complications, as dozens of cases have found in clinical trials. Many nations, including Germany, have halted the use of their vaccine, as a result.

Other vaccines, however, like Sputnik V and Janssen COVID-19 vaccine, have demonstrated efficacy rates well over 90 percent, becoming one of the leading vaccines in the Western world during the pandemic.

Image courtesy of Pfizer